December 2016 - January 2017

FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH
MAKING THE VISION & MISsION COME TO LIFE
EXCELLENCE

Next to Integrity and Respect, Excellence is the third most popular core value at Fortune 500 companies. We view the core value as pivotal to our quest to reach Peak Performance. Some companies label excellence as “Quality” while other refer to it as “Performance”. But the theme is almost always the same – a commitment to being the best and/or delivering the best. I am encouraging all our staff to exceed expectations and constantly excel at the highest level of service delivery, stakeholder engagement and in everything that we do. Embedded within excellence are concepts such as:



Innovation - strive to improve and learn something new every day.
Teamwork - to assist and help each other for improved solutions.
Role Model - set high expectations in actions.
Ambition - set and achieve challenging goals.
Quality - doing things right the first time.

Excellence should not be defined too broadly neither should it be taken lightly. Each individual must set their own standards in line with the organisation’s goals and strive to improve on it all the time. In whatever you do, set your Personal Best (PB) standard and then work towards improving it on a daily basis. This in time will lead to excellence and the Peak Performance associated with excellence. Let’s all strive to deliver unmatched performance, constantly raising the bar and constantly improving through learning new ways of delivery.

Article by:  Lyndon Barends – NHA Managing Director


NHA Equine Welfare & Veterinary
New rules regarding exempted & forbidden substances and passports

Trainers will be pleased to hear that the National Board has agreed with the Exempted Substance List proposal that was put before them in October 2016. As a result, as of 21 October 2016, the following substances are exempted from prosecution as prohibited substances:

  1. Antibiotics /Antimicrobials (with the exception of procaine penicillin).
  2. Anti-parasitic medication approved and registered for use in horses.
  3. Anti-viral medication approved and registered for use in horses.
  4. Anti-fungal medication approved and registered for use in horses.
  5. Anti-ulcer medication approved and registered for use in horses.
  6. Registered vaccines against infectious agents in horses.
  7. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate.
  8. Locally registered oestrus suppressant medications in the female horse.


It is important to note that the above medications MUST be used according to manufacturer and/or supplier recommendations.

Any obvious attempt to misuse or overdose these medications would still be considered prohibited.  This new rule now enables horses to compete on anti-ulcer medication.  This is important as it has always been a concern that withdrawal of this medication prior to a race day, when the horse probably needs it the most, is a welfare issue. We are happy to join a move around the world to permit the use of anti-ulcer medication.  The rule regarding passports has also been modified. Passports must now stay with the horse, even when they retire from racing and should only be returned to the NHA on the demise of the horse. In other words, passports are issued for life.  Please note the changes to the Forbidden Substance List as contained in the articled below. The most important one to note is Clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) which is considered to be an anabolic agent i.e. a Class 1 offence, UNLESS it is prescribed by a veterinarian as a bronchodilator and recorded in the Vet Treatment Record as such. In such a case, it would be treated as a Class 4 offence.

Ractopamine on the other hand, will always be a Class 1 offence, as there is no reason for it ever to be found in a horse.  Remember that medication may only be prescribed for 30 days, so any medication older than that has to be returned to the prescribing vet or redispensed. Any expired or unused/ superfluous medication must also be returned to the prescribing vet and may not be left lying about or used on another horse for whom it has not been prescribed.
Should you have any queries regarding all these changes, please consult with your NHA vet and we will be happy to explain or discuss the applicable changes.

Article by: Dr Dale Wheeler

NEWS FROM THE NHA LABORATORY
It is well recognised that the injured racehorse and horses which suffer from particular conditions or diseases, require treatment for best recovery. Often medications are required for such treatment. It is then important that this treatment is for an extended period of time as to assist the best recovery of the horse while providing comfort to the horse.  At the NHA Laboratory we assist with guidance to make such administration of medication for as long as possible.  On the NHA website Laboratory section an administration guide is published which provides information on the “detection times” of many therapeutic substances.

While the NHA must ensure that the welfare of the horse is maintained in that substances which affect the horse are not present at therapeutic levels on race day, such guidance allows the longest period of treatment without introducing the risk of a positive finding.  The definition of “detection time” in this context is “the last time period following administration during which the substance was shown to exceed the urine and/ or plasma screening limit concentration observed within a significant population of treated horses.”

The veterinarian treating a horse with such a substance has the responsibility to advise to extend this period suitably as to introduce a suitable safety margin. Often a period of a two days is suitable, but it can be longer for preparations and substances with longer detection times (for instance exceeding a week).  The detection times have to be scientifically sensible so as not to result in therapeutic substance prosecution at low to trace levels where these do not affect the horse. For this purpose, these detection times are linked to actual corresponding screening limits.  These are concentrations exceeding which a therapeutic effect is considered in the horse and a positive finding is declared. Below these levels there is no action on such findings.  There currently are three types of screening limits, being International, Asian and European. As a member of both the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities and the Asian Racing Federation, the NHA subscribes to International Screening Limits (ISL’s) and Asian Screening Limits (ASL’s) as indicated on the NHA website Laboratory section. Additionally we apply International Residue Limits (IRL’s) which consider feed, other contaminants and environmental substances. Not applicable to the NHA is the European (EHSLC) guidance to which the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI, for equestrian sport) subscribes. The locally affected disciplines to which the EHSLC guide however applies include dressage, show jumping, endurance riding and show horses and show ponies.

The Laboratory constitutes one of the four laboratory scientists in the Asia Racing Federation who make up the Asian Drug Control Committee. This committee decides on the concentration values of the Asian Screening Limits and makes recommendation of the values of the International Screening Limits in consultation with the European EHSLC group. This involves the pharmacological and biochemical study of a wide range of scientific evidence and administration trial concentration and elimination data.  This above screening limit provides guidance and clarity to Veterinarians, Trainers and the industry, this is important as it relates to the welfare of the racehorse. It clarifies how we are aligned to the international guidance and standards for both screening and prosecution. The NHA website now also provides guidance for “Exempted Substances” which do not affect the performance of the horse and are not prohibited substances within competition (on race day) or out of competition.

Article by: Dr Schalk de Kock


HORSES FOR CAUSES - CHARITY FUNDRAISER
The Horses for Causes project was launched by the Riverside Educational & Upliftment Trust (IT332/2009), a charitable trust which focuses on raising funds for a number of local NGOs. Horses for Causes 2017 takes place on 11 February 2017. The funds raised will be split equally between 14 participating NGOs.  All donations to Horses for Causes Charity Race Day are tax deductible. The Laboratory constitutes one of the four laboratory scientists in the Asia Racing Federation who make up the Asian Drug Control Committee.  This committee decides on the concentration values of the Asian Screening Limits and makes recommendation of the values of the International Screening Limits in consultation with the European EHSLC group.  This involves the pharmacological and biochemical study of a wide range of scientific evidence and administration trial concentration and elimination data.  This above screening limit provides guidance and clarity to Veterinarians, Trainers and the industry, this is important as it relates to the welfare of the racehorse. It clarifies how we are aligned to the international guidance and standards for both screening and prosecution.  The NHA website now also provides guidance for “Exempted Substances” which do not affect the performance of the horse and are not prohibited substances within competition (on race day) or out of competition.  At the NHA Laboratory we assist with guidance to make such administration of medication for as long as possible.  On the NHA website Laboratory section an administration guide is published which provides information on the “detection times” of many therapeutic substance. While the NHA must ensure that the welfare of the horse is maintained in that substances which affect the horse are not present at therapeutic levels on race day, such guidance allows the longest period of treatment without introducing the risk of a positive finding.  The definition of “detection time” in this context is “the last time period following administration during which the substance was shown to exceed the urine and/ or plasma screening limit concentration observed within a significant population of treated horses.” 

The 14 beneficiaries are the Grooms School Trust, the Cart Horse Protection Association, the Jockey Academy Scholarship Fund; five projects which power youth through sport, music and education (JAG Foundation, Sporting Chance, JP21 Project, KMA Music Academy and Masicorp); the Chaeli Campaignn which does invaluable work in the disability sector; Santa’s Shoeboxwhich provides gifts and necessities for the underprivileged at Christmas time; the Sunflower Fund which focusses on bone marrow typing and matching; the Lucky Lucy Foundation which provides care for abandoned and abused domestic animals; Thrive Hout Bay which promotes zero-waste and environmental and sustainability activities; and GCBDT which imparts entrepreneurial skills and support to start-up businessmen in Khayelitsha.  Horses for Causes 2017 will be far more than a fundraiser. On the day, there will be an entertainment programme including music, wheelchair dancing, mini rugby, mini cricket and mini soccer; corporate hospitality tables in the Peninsula, Kenilworth and Somerset Rooms; a stallion services auction; and a concert by well-known musician Majozi after the last race.  The Oval Market, normally operating at Kenilworth on Wednesday evenings, will also be joining in the Saturday’s festivities. Neil Andrews (who needs no introduction to the racing fraternity), will do the honours as MC in the Peninsula, Kenilworth and Somerset Rooms.  Horses for Causes intends to grow into the primary community outreach event on the Western Cape horse racing calendar.

Article by: Tracy Green - Horses for Charity


SOUTH AFRICAN JOCKEY ACADEMY MAINTAINS 100% MATRIC PASS RATE
The SAJA 2016 Matric Class  of Calvin Habib and Liam Tarentaal both passed Matric, with Diploma Passes. In doing so, the pair ensured that the Academy’s record of a 100% Matric Pass Rate has been maintained.  Academy Headmaster, Graham Bailey, couldn’t be prouder of the 2016 Matric Results and hailed the committment of the Matrics and their teachers saying “These excellent results are so impressive if you consider the pressure the Matrics are under with their work and race riding responsibilities on top of their academic work. Our teachers have such limited notational time to complete the Matric syllabus that these results talk not only to the high standard of education at the Academy but also to the hard work and study put in by Calvin and Liam.”  Calvin Habib was the Dux for 2016 and also won numerous Awards and Trophies at the Annual Speech Day and Prize Giving Ceremony, which included:

  • The Rakesh Jeewanlall Award – which is an award, of racing equipment, sponsored by Mr Jeewanlall a Stipendiary Steward on the KZN Board, is awarded to the most well-mannered, disciplined, passionate and improved apprentice for the year.
  • Headmaster’s Award – which is an award given at the discretion of the headmaster and was awarded to Calvin for his courage, determination and perseverance.
  • The Happy Chimes Trophy – this trophy, donated by Christopher Taylor, is named in memory of Mrs Jackie Bridel’s horse ‘Happy Chimes’, is awarded to a 2nd year Apprentice who has shown the most riding progress during the year.